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EUH 4501UHA: England Until 1688

Research guide for the study of the era from the Norman Conquest to the Glorious Revolution (1066 - 1688). Originally created for Dr. Kerns' EUH 4501 class.

York Minster, Nave, west window
Artstor

Brainstorm


On this page, we will discuss the makings of a good topic and how that can drive your research journey.

WHERE TO START

I have the topic, but I'm not sure how to approach researching it... Is the Internet the best choice for my research...?

You don't need to be an expert on a topic to do a report about it.

A good place to start (especially if you don't know much about your topic), is the Library Catalog to help you find books that give you general information. Encyclopedias are good for concise explanations and contextual data. A librarian can recommend the best encyclopedias or other reference materials you may want to use.

Build on your basic information and skills. Avail yourself to information in all formats: Books (on the shelves and online); Periodicals (journal, magazine, newspaper articles both on the shelves and through databases); Digital media (videos, CD-ROMs, DVDs, etc.); and even some Internet sites.

Your professor will tell you whether you are allowed to use Web sites as resources. Most people can surf the Internet and find topical information but cannot determine if what they've found is accurate, objective or up-to-date. 

For assistance on developing the most efficient research strategy and identification of local resources, contact a reference librarian at the library or via Ask Us.

STEP 3: RESEARCHING CYCLE